Chapter 5: Precipitation (P)

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Chapter 5: Precipitation (P)

Post by admin » Tue Oct 06, 2015 9:35 am

Originally posted by Rem Westland - 03/10/2013

This is all about rain and snow falling onto the Lake itself. The Kennebec Lake Association made an effort to record the volume of water that fell onto their lake and then to measure what happened to the level of the lake. It was not a one-to-one relationship: the volume of rain that fell should have had more of an impact on water level than it did. This raised questions about the role of wetlands (did some of the rising water slosh over into the wetlands?) and the need to recalculate outflows (chapter 7 below). The content of rain, of course, impacts on water quality. We no longer talk much about acid rain...but it's still there. We also do not talk enough about pollen and dust that can be carried on air currents and deposited in our Lake when it rains. This will be an interesting chapter too.
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Re: Chapter 5: Precipitation (P)

Post by admin » Tue Oct 06, 2015 9:35 am

Originally posted by Rem Westland - 08/10/2013

There are some estimates available for eastern Ontario lakes. Precipitation is about 35 inches per year, on average. This number can be converted to cubic feet per year (or per second, to match outflow estimates) once we have a figure for the area of our Lake. If we assume the area of Sharbot Lake is 10 square miles then the precipitation of 35 inches per year (which adds 2.92 feet to the water level) adds about 800 million cubic feet to the water volume each year.
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